French Fridays with Dorie – Pommes Confites

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I opted to go with the fancy French term for the title of this post since every time I said “Long & Slow Apples” around my husband and friends there were snickers and sexual innuendos aplenty. Really guys? I was excited to try this recipe for a multitude of reasons but the biggest one was that I finally decided to face my fear and use a mandoline. We sell tons of them at the store but I have heard so many horror stories that I have been too afraid to use one, let alone buy one. We have one in the store kitchen and for some reason today I just felt up to the task.

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We also have an apple corer there which is another gadget I don’t yet own. I opted to leave the apples whole and slice them that way because it somehow seemed safer to try to cut the whole apple on the mandoline. Don’t ask me how my brain works, it’s a mystery.

Pink Ladies are my apple of choice these days so I was hoping they would be good in this (and I was right). Pink Ladies ARE the coolest ladies after all.

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Stockard Channing is so totally boss as Rizzo – I really don’t see how anyone else could ever be as cool as her. But back to the apples and all that. I decided to use one of my other favorite gadgets – the Microplane – for the orange zest because I don’t see the point of finely chopping zest when I can make it light and fluffy and beautiful with a rasp much faster.

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I got these ready to go and popped them in the oven while my co-worker and I went down to Madison to set up for the big bridal show this weekend. Wish me all kinds of luck because two days of bridal show is about one too many. When we got back they were ready to go and made a delicious dessert after a living room picnic dinner with our neighbors.

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After reading a few posts this morning I was nervous about the whole plastic wrap issue but then I discovered that my copy of AMFT doesn’t even say to use plastic wrap. It says “Top each ramekin with a circle of parchment and then wrap in foil; use a small knife to pierce both the parchment and foil in about 4 places. Put the ramekins on the baking sheet and weight each ramekin down.” No plastic wrap mentioned at all. The Bonne Idee for Twenty-Hour Apples says to wrap them in plastic but that’s a totally different animal. Could I have a later printing of the book where they changed the recipe? Interesting. I loved this simple dessert and I definitely love that I still have all my fingertips after my first experience with a mandoline! I found the recipe online here with the same no-plastic wrap instructions for those who want to brave mandolines & snorts & innuendo from friends to give this one a try.

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17 thoughts on “French Fridays with Dorie – Pommes Confites

  1. I am going to check your fingers on Thursday when I came in to do my class. Are you sure you have ten? As you know, I love my mandoline and use it often. The apples look beautiful!

  2. Maggie your pommes confites look perfect! I felt the same about the orange zest; how much smaller could it need to be? I had the plastic wrap instructions but luckily I read Mardi’s post in time to prevent disaster! I love my mandoline but care does need to be taken!

  3. I woke up this morning, turned on my computer, checked my e-mails and found e-mails from Maggie, Maggie, Maggie, Maggie. You’re on a rolllllll. Thank you. I also didn’t like the name, Long & Slow Apples, but just because it was boring. I didn’t even t-h-i-n-k of snickering or of sexual innuendos. I blame that on Michael. He was almost 20 years older than me so we mostly socialized with a older crowd that was beyond that kinda thinking. (Your group seems hilarious!!!) Maggie, your apple dessert looks beautiful. Well done, my girl. You’ve got that mandoline talkin’ pretty. I find it interesting that the directions were changed in later printings of the cook book. I didn’t realize there had been more than one printing run. My cookbook said “plastic” but I am wwaaayyyyyy smarter than that. Last time I looked, plastic, if it’s hot, melts……always.

  4. Very neat apple layering skills.
    Yes – the name did get a comment or two in this house.
    And bless your soul for doing the bridal shower. The Dude’s daughter just started planning her wedding – and lemme tell you, I think both he and I are going to go crazy before her wedding. 15. Months. From. Now.
    (P.S. I do think there was a second printing – where they probably fixed a couple of things…)

  5. Very nice apples! So do I understand correctly that you sliced them on the mandolin, then cored them? Or am I being dense?

  6. Hi Maggie, mandolines terify me too because I have read so many horror stories. I treat mine with very deep respect. LOL – I like pink ladies too, but used Sundowners this time because they were cheaper. Your apples look lovely – so neat. You may have a later printing of the book – I have a first ed, which definitely refers to the plastic wrap, but I saved myself the agony by Googling some people’s earlier efforts at this recipe.

  7. That innuendo didn’t occur to me either… Your pommes confits look excellent! I’m definitely going to use parchment next time, even though my plastic didn’t melt.

  8. Your apples look so beautiful plated! I was lazy and left mine in the ramekins. My book also is an updated version. Thankfully! I would have been so upset to ruin such a lovely dessert!

  9. Pink Ladies are my favourite apples, too. I have an older version of the cookbook, but I just skipped the plastic wrap suggestion – I found it alarming! Your apples turned out beautifully.

  10. Hi Maggie, Your apples look absolutely perfect…love that you cut them in rounds. I too, am not found of using the mandoline, however, I did use it for these….very carefully!! I also zested my orange peel with my microplane. I love that you were able to do these at work…how cool!
    My book did say to use plastic wrap. I did and had no problems with it, but would have preferred to use parchment paper. Thanks for the info.

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